Friday, 7 October 2011

Accidental orienteering song?

I've stepped into this one that I had to share:



You're taken by the woods even though you're aware
of the slippery cliffs and the big black bears
and the salal snares taller than yourself
Ferns growing as thick as the trees
You're looking for a flag at the top of the hill
It's a race against the light
And one false step could mean staying the night
That's why you should never travel alone
You should never travel alone
and you know that one false step
and you might not make it home
And so you watch for loose rocks under your feet
Stepping onto wet stones, crossing over creeks
Climbing up cliffs and over dead trees
You watch your step, you get your footing right
A broken compass could mean staying the night
and you should always know where you're going
Even if you've got a map
you should always know where you're going
And you know that even if you've got a map
you might not make it home

You take your time just to breathe the air
and appreciate having never met a bear
You capture the flag at the top of the hill
With daylight to spare
Orienteering comes naturally
You read the map right
One wrong turn could mean staying the night
and though you carry your phone
You should never travel alone
And you know that
because one false step
and you might not make it home and

Even if you've got a map
and you know where you're going
You're still a long way from your home
And even if you've got a map
you should never travel alone
And you know that
But you're not dead yet
and you might just make it home

Thursday, 6 October 2011

End of 2011 season

I've participated in the portuguese training camp to WOC 2012 27Sept-2Oct in Switzerland to close the season. The last race with a forest map had been 3 months before so I wasn't expecting too much. However I got better day by day and enjoyed the Swiss terrains. I liked the World Cup race but was disappointed by some avoidable losses of time.

TICKS, TICKS, TICKS...

In the last day in Swiss terrains I extracted a tick from my hand (had been there less than 2h). 2 days after I got swollen and painful axillary lymph nodes and I was advised to do antibiotic profilaxy to Lyme disease. Probably this is a recurrent thing among orienteerers once ticks are spread all over Europe, but in Portugal (and Iberic peninsula) it isn't a problem. Even if the rate of infected ticks with TBE (tick born encephalitis) is between 0.5% and 3%, I'm considering being vaccinated to TBE once I like to be on the safe side.

All over Switzerland 5-30% (up to 50%) of ticks are infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. An estimated 3’000 people yearly contract the so-called Lyme disease caused by this bacterium. Lyme disease can be treated with antibiotics.

In Switzerland, in 2005 the cases of TBE (tick born encephalitis) drastically increased with 200 cases, compared to an average of 100 per year during the preceding 5 years. Certain patients can experience paralysis of arms, legs or facial nerves, which can lead to permanent disabilities. There is a well-tolerated and efficient vaccination against tick-borne encephalitis.


+ info about ticks at here, here and here (last one by british orienteering).

WHAT'S NEXT...

Now, a 15 day deserved physical rest. Can't wait for next season. It'll be the first one as a doctor, rather than a student. Without exam seasons, that means 52 WHOLE free weekends per year to train as an animal. I've signed for Maratona Clube de Portugal, a club with world class athletes and I'm confident that I'll be able to improve my physical capabilities.